Symposium Announcement – Building Resilience: “From Catastrophe to Capacity”

Toronto, ON – Canadian Risk and Hazards Network (CRHNet) has launched registration for its 14th Annual Symposium to be held at the historical Pier 21 in Halifax, NS from October 25-27th, 2017. The Symposium answers the association’s mandate to create a Canadian annual event for dialogue focusing on disaster risk reduction, facilitating policy formulation and adaptation of best practices in Canada.

200 attendees are expected over the three days, supporting the CRHNet’s goal to explore local and international solutions to common local and global challenges to benefit us as a global community. This year’s program will continue to review and discuss the history of hazard characterization and disaster risk reduction with a key to creating a vision for the future. Sharing innovative approaches and building best practices to reduce disaster vulnerability in Canada is a responsibility that must not be taken lightly. The diverse audience includes both public and private sectors, and professionals from first responders, academics and practitioners; last year from 11 different countries.

2017 is a monumental year in disaster and emergency management, beyond it being Canada’s 150th birthday, and ties into the theme “Building Resilience: “From Catastrophe to Capacity”. Marking 100 years since Canada’s largest disaster, the Halifax explosion of 1917 is a historic catastrophe that is still studied and reviewed. Our country’s capacity to manage disasters and emergencies has been helped immeasurably by two organizations that are both also celebrating their 100th year in service; the Salvation Army and the Red Cross. It’s through the collaborative nature of the Annual Symposium that knowledge, research and solutions are shared to help develop a more resilient country. We will celebrate and explore historical and recent incidents and together we can learn and improve our strategies from this.

The three day Symposium will  feature over 80 sessions including keynote speakers and four simultaneous thematic breakout sessions, panel discussions and poster presentations that will, in part, include the following topics and focuses;

  • 100 Years Later – Revisiting the Halifax Explosion
  • Citizen and volunteer contributions to DRR
  • Domestic Animals and Disaster Response
  • Implementing Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in Provincial Emergency Management Frameworks
  • Measuring Disaster Risk Reduction Achievement in Canada
  • Youth Engagement
  • Building Indigenous Resilience

CRHNet strives to reducing risk through partnerships calls attention to the need for the sharing of information to enhance the understanding of, and provide tools for, the development of comprehensive programs to mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all types of disasters – natural, technological or human-induced.  We encourage both the attendance of emergency management professionals to attend, and organizations with services and products that strengthen this goal to partner with us to deliver content, insight and shared knowledge to those in attendance.

“As an emergency management practitioner, one of the greatest challenges I face is the ability to learn and incorporate new research into my program. Of the emergency management conferences I have attended, the CRHNet symposium is the best avenue for addressing this need and helping to bridge the gap between practitioners and academics”

Full details are available at www.CRHNet.ca. Visit here to register, and for more information on partnerships and exhibitor options please visit here.

Carly Benson MA DEM, CEM
Dir. of Emergency Management
Town of High River

About CRHNet: CRHNet is a not-for-profit organization established in 2003 to promote and strengthen disaster risk reduction and emergency management in Canada. The Network creates an environment for hazards research, education and emergency management practitioner communities to effectively share knowledge and innovative approaches that reduce disaster vulnerability.

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